Advocates for Human Potential, Inc.

A Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) funded program provided by Advocates for Human Potential, Inc. (AHP)
in partnership with Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities (TASC) and AdCare Criminal Justice Services (ACJS).

 

See it now! 

Prison/Jail Medication Assisted Treatment Re-entry Programs


 

 

Read it now!
Prison/Jail Medication Assisted Treatment Manual

Once you've seen the video, read the details of these exemplary programs.




 

RSAT, take note!

All RSAT programs should follow Pennsylvania Department of Corrections' lead.

"The PA DOC will no longer do business with service providers who do not, at all levels, support the use of Medication Assisted Treatment"
Source: PA DOC MAT Expansion Plan, p. 8




What Inmates Tell us About RSAT





RSAT Jail Program Tour






Everything you need to know about your state's health insurance opportunities

Save the date,
July 25-27, 2016



5th annual RSAT Workshop, Providence, Rhode Island See Agenda 
Promising Practices, Useful Studies, and News You Can Use:
  • Changing face of MAT maintenance programing in prisons and jails is described.

  • Correctional Officer Wellness and Safety Literature Review

    One of the greatest threats to correctional officer (CO) wellness involves the stress they encounter as a result of their occupation. This document reviews the body of literature on the causes and effects of stress for COs, and describes the available research on CO wellness programs and their effectiveness., including stressed that are Inmate-related (dealing with threats, mental illness, substance abuse, suicide); Occupational (inherent to the profession), Organizational/administrative (mismanagement, poor leadership, inadequate resources/ pay, understaffing) and Psycho-social (fear, work/family conflict, media scrutiny, etc).

  • Questions and answers for state Medicaid directors regarding coverage for inmates, probationers, parolees, those residing in residential facilities.

    Question: What about residents in a halfway houses? Answer: Federal Financial Participation is available for covered services for Medicaid-eligible individuals living in state or local corrections-related supervised community residential facilities (whether operated by a governmental entity or a private entity) unless the individual does not have freedom of movement and association while residing at the facility....

  • Important Answers on Medicaid for Transitioning Inmates

    The Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services (CMCS) has issued guidance to states on Medicaid inmate eligibility, enrollment and coverage policy. This letter with attached Questions and Answers (Qs & As) describes how states can better facilitate access to Medicaid services for individuals transitioning from incarceration to their communities. The letter is available online on Medicaid.gov at http://www.medicaid.gov/federal-policy-guidance/federal-policy-guidance.html

  • SAMHSA’s Reentry Resource Guide for Individuals, Providers, Communities, and States

    This resource guide from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides reentry information for behavioral health providers, criminal justice practitioners, people returning home from incarceration, and state and local policymakers.

  • http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/34/12/2044

    This article describes current jail and prison efforts to enroll inmates in Medicaid pre-release. It provides an overview of sixty-four programs operating in jails, prisons, or community probation and parole systems that enroll individuals during detention, incarceration, and the release process. Seventy-seven percent of the programs are located in jails,and 56 percent use personnel from public health or social service agencies. It then describes four practices that have facilitated the Medicaid enrollment process: suspending instead of terminating Medicaid benefits upon incarceration, presuming that an individual is eligible for Medicaid before the process is completed, allowing enrollment during incarceration, and accepting alternative forms of identification for enrollment.

  • Important Answers on Medicaid for Transitioning Inmates

    The Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services (CMCS) has issued guidance to states on Medicaid inmate eligibility, enrollment and coverage policy. This letter with attached Questions and Answers (Qs & As) describes how states can better facilitate access to Medicaid services for individuals transitioning from incarceration to their communities. The letter is available online on Medicaid.gov at http://www.medicaid.gov/federal-policy-guidance/federal-policy-guidance.html

  • Injected Naltrexone for Justice Involved Opioid Addicts Compared to Treatment as Usual

    New study examined 153 justice-involved opioid addicts at five sites in four major cities provided monthly injections of naltrexone (Vivitrol) and compared them to 155 who were referred to treatment as usual, counseling and community treatment programs. After six months of injections, 43% of the former group relapsed compared to 64% of those without the shots. Also the former who relapsed managed to stay drug free twice as long as the comparison group. One year after treatment ended, relapses were equivalent. There were more drug overdoses in the non-naltrexone group. The take away: The medication facilitated recovery, but addicts need more than six months of shots and treatment to make a long term difference. However, in regard to medications for opioid treatment, as one researcher concluded: "Right now, there's no debate or argument that going on medications is a better approach. If you're not using medications, you're not really practicing effective evidence-based medicine."

  • Methadone continuation versus forced withdrawal on incarceration in a combined US prison and jail: a randomized,open-label trial

    This study compared inmates who continued methadone while incarcerated and those who were detoxed and not allowed to continue. More of the former, not surprisingly, continued methadone upon release. More of the latter continued using illicit opioids. Both groups reported drug overdoses and one of the released inmates that had been maintained on methadone died of an overdose after release.

  • Promising Practices Archive

    The promising practices archive houses useful resources for the RSAT community.



 
Participate in our forum!

Why should prisons or jails provide medications, i.e. drugs, to addicted inmates who are now off drugs, some for the first time in years?